BLOG

Kenya Building Manual wins Research Grant

The Kenya Building Manual, and on-going project between GA Collaborative and students from the Rhode Island School of Design & the University of Virginia to investigate, communicate, and disseminate low impact building techniques to developing communities in Kenya and across sub Saharan Africa, has received a Summer Research Grant from the University of Virginia. The research will investigate and develop graphic modes of communication. 

Read More

TEAME Wins the Providence Preservation Society Headquarters Renovation Project

TEAME wins the Providence Preservation Society Headquarters Renovation Project. The Competition combines RISD students and faculty in a five day charette that examines renovation of the PPS's historic headquarters buildings. The project will be on display  at the Providence Preservation Society's Symposium Why Preserve? in the Industrial Trust Building, 111 Westminster Street, November 3rd & 4th. 

TEAME:

Students: Xunqi Shen, Madison Kim, Minhee Kim, Gloria Ramirez, Shuchen Peng, Peihan Wang, Mariah Bennett , Danning Niu

faculty: Michael Leighton Beaman

Read More

"Speculative Landforms" Awarded RISD Research Grant

The Speculative Landforms Project (SLP) is part of an on-going cross-disciplinary design/research agenda that examines the ontologies of future anthropogenic land forms.

Human beings already operate as geomorphic agents, directly reshaping the surface of the Earth to provide capacities not currently or adequately available. The Speculative Landforms Project treats this activity as a design problems by expanding the operability and agency of environmental design practice via historical inquiry, simulation, and representation

Read More

Leighton Beaman awarded 2016 MacDowell Colony Fellowship

Leighton Beaman was named a 2016 MacDowell Colony Fellow.  The residency will focus on the Speculative Landforms Project (SLP). SLP examines the future of anthropogentric geological scale land manipulation as a design problems by expanding the operability and agency of environmental design practice via historical inquiry, simulation, and representation.

 

Read More

Leighton Beaman receives PTFA Design Technology Grant

Leighton Beaman was selected for a PTFA Design Technology Grant for the Object-Oriented Ergonomics Research Project (OOE).  

The OOE project examines changing definitions of ergonomics within post-humanist design theory, through the simulation and production of alternative biogenic human forms. Mirroring conceptual approaches in the emerging theoretical school of speculative realism, the OOE project re-focuses ergonomic design research away from anthropocentrism and towards understanding the relationships between autonomies  and environments.

The OOE project is the first step in applying this theoretical approach to modes of design practice. 

Read More

"Compu-tectonics" Awarded Bridge Research Grant

Computational Ecologies is a collaborative research project that focuses on computational design processes which and their cyclical relationships to computer numerically controlled machines via material artifacts. This project is an extension of the ongoing research of the RISD Code Studio, merging two research practices into a common computational environment to find novel ways of expanding design practice, artistic inquiry, and design education pedagogy. The following proposal is for an intensive three week project workshop during the summer of 2015 that utilizes the equipment and collaborative work space of the Co-Works facility.

Read More

“Woven Building Systems” Receives Technology Research Grant

The Woven Building Systems for Developing Communities research project is an investigation of performative woven systems for buildings, which have low environmental impact, yet require little to no construction experience to make. Over the summer of 2015 this research will focus on three aspects of woven building skins generated and analyzed through computational methodologies and developed and tested through material practices: Patterns, Performances, and Assemblies. This project combines two broader research objectives: 1) the exploration of computational processes through procedural and material design investigations, and 2) the development of design agency for underrepresented and developing communities interested in shaping their own built environments.

Read More

Leighton Beaman + Carl Lostritto awarded Co-Works Research Project

Leighton Beaman + Carl Lostritto were awarded a Co-Works Summer Research Project - "Compu-tectonic Assemblies".


Computectonic Assemblies is a collaborative research project that focuses on computational design processes and their cyclical relationships to computer numerically controlled machines via material artifacts. This project is an extension of the ongoing research of the RISD Code Studio, merging two research practices into a common computational environment to find novel ways of expanding design practice, artistic inquiry, and design education pedagogy. The following proposal is for an intensive three week project workshop during the summer of 2015 that utilizes the equipment and collaborative work space of the Co-Works facility.

Through the combination of multiple modes and dimensions of assembly and analysis, our goal is to develop new hybrid methodologies, which may be models for new courses, workshops or tutorials within and around the Code Studio. The findings of this research may offer relevant knowledge to design manufacturing. The artifacts produced by and implicated in this research may also stand as autonomous works. Computectonics is the practice of generating workflows that span to and from computational models to physical artifacts. Our inquiry into the assembly of computectonic methods fall into two research domains: Procedures and Materials.

Read More

Beta-field wins Graham Foundation Grant

The Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts awarded Zaneta Hong + Leighton Beaman a Graham Grant towards the Landformation Catalogue.

The Landformation Catalogue focused on revealing the generative methods of landform design and construction. Three parameters - operations, materials and technologies - provide the basis for this research. With the goal to communicate the formative relationships between these three defining parameters across scales and geographies, the Landformation Catalogue establishes a morphologic index of forms and taxonometric organization of effects. By combining computational-based simulations, digitally-fabricated artifacts, and graphic illustrations, the Landformation Catalogue provides an alternative categorical structure and analytical framework for exploring the inception and evolutionary development of constructed landforms.

The work from the Landformation Catalogue will be exhibited at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Read More

Leighton Beaman named AIA Emerging Practitioner

Michael Leighton Beaman was named an Emerging Practitioner by the American Institute of Architects [AIA] in Washington DC. His design research project Proxy No. 08 will be part of the AIA's Emerging Practitioners Exhibition, along with the installation of Proxy No. 10 designed specifically for the AIA National Headquarters.

Read More

Leighton Beaman named 2010-2012 Virginia Teaching Fellow in Architecture

Leighton Beaman has been selected as the 2010-2012 University of Virginia School of Architecture Teaching Fellow.

The Virginia Teaching Fellow [VTF] allows young faculty the opportunity to pursue research topics through studio courses and publications. His inquiry into adaptive systems constructed through computation and realized in material form will be the focus of research during his time at the University of Virginia. 

Read More