BLOG

"Documenting Landscapes" | Exhibition @ the Fogg Art Museum

Zaneta Hong curated a collection of photographs from the Harvard Universities photography collection which examine the ways scientific instrumentation records its environment.  The collection is part of her course of visualization and landscape architecture taught at the Graduate School of Design.

VIS 2141: Landscape Representation I introduces students to the history, techniques, and conventions of representation used in the field of landscape architecture. Rather than a static description of a design agenda, landscape representation is an active means for building and understanding complexity in design work. 

For more information visit the Fogg Art Museum at http://www.harvardartmuseums.org

Read More

Platform 8 Exhibition @ Harvard University, GSD

The Harvard Graduate School of Design’s Platform exhibition, now in its eighth year, presents a curated selection of work generated in the previous academic year at the school. Each year, a different GSD faculty member is chosen to edit the publication for the Platform exhibition.

Project Credits

Faculty Editor & Lecturer in Landscape Architecture: Zaneta H. Hong.

Exhibition Student Designers: Daniel Carlson, Ambrose Luk, Nina Phinouwong, and Vipavee Sirivatanaaksorn.

GSD Exhibitions Team: Dan Borelli, Raymond Coffey, Anita Kan, Sarah Lubin, Jesus Matheus, Matt Murphy, Joanna Vouriotis, Liz Welch, and David W. Zimmerman-Stuart. 

Exhibition Design & Fabrication: Michael Leighton Beaman and Reid Schwartz. 

Publication Design: Zaneta Hong, Michael Leighton Beaman, Alexander Louis Cassini, Mikhail Thomas Grinwald, and Vi Vu. 

Publication Student Editors: Alexander Louis Cassini, Mikhail Thomas Grinwald, and Vi Vu. 

GSD Communications Team: Travis Dagenais, Maggie Janik, Benjamin Prosky, and Ronee Saroff.

Join us for a discussion with Zaneta Hong, lecturer in landscape architecture at Harvard GSD, and this year’s Platform faculty editor, for the launch of Platform 8: An Index of Design and Research. Professor Hong will be discussing the publication, as well as the production and exhibition of Platform 8.

For more information visit the Van Alen Institute Website

Read More

The Landformation Catalogue Exhibition Publication is Now Available

The Landformation  Catalogue  Exhibition Publication is now available. The Landformation Catalogue is an ongoing research agenda that examines the generative methodologies of landform manipulation, revealing correlations between the histories, morphologies, assemblies, materials, and affordances of landscape practice. It analyzes the resulting spatial artifacts of humanity’s larger Earth transformation project.

The publication was made possible through a grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Read More

"Reciprocal Artifacts" @ ACADIA 2015 Conference

Reciprocal Artifacts is a series of design investigations focused on generating topological and material reciprocity between anthropocentric and non-anthropocentric spatial ontologies within a single artifact. Expanding on the role of the artifact as both, indexical of and emergent from the circumstances leading to its formation, this research posits that artifacts are more than a vestigial product of expansive processes at work. They are the means by which relationships between these circumstances and processes find expression. Reciprocity, between multiple agents or systems, is the degree to which each can perturb or irritate the environment of another, eliciting transformative responses and adaptations. Reciprocal artifacts are formed through mutual perturbations that generate integrated and co-evolutionary effects.

The subset of findings presented at the 2015 ACADIA Conference is a collection of artifacts produced through the merging of two divergent physiogenic spatial ontologies: spatial enclosure in the form of three-dimensional boundary/edge conditions, and biological (arboreal) continuities derived from their taxonometric morphologies. The resulting artifacts are not singularly anthropogenic in their formation, definition, and material assembly; nor are they centered, motivated, or evaluated by human experience and human affordance. Rather, these studies ground both anthropogenic and non-anthropogenic forms of creativity in a mutually foreign and equally representational computational environment. They explore questions of how design processes built from both human and nonhuman actors develop agency and expression.

Read More

"Excerpts from the Proxy Series" @ BSA Exhibition - Bigger Than a Bread Box

The purpose of the proxy series of installations is to experiment with with the workflow of an entire project, from conception to construction.  Though these projects operate at smaller dimensional, programmatic and financial scales, they are always addressing larger issues of design practice by crafting resonance between procedural and material effects.

Bigger Than a Bread Box Exhibition Opens -  Beta-field was selected to contribute work from their proxy series in this "installation as research" exhibition. The Exhibition will run from June 17th - October 4th at the Boston Society of Architects / AIA - BSA Space, at 290 Congress st. in Boston MA.

Read More

Proxy No. 15 @ Boston Society of Architects Exhibition

Leighton Beaman and Zaneta Hong’s Proposal for the Boston Society of Architects [ Proxy No. 15 ] was selected as part of the Bigger than a Bread Box exhibition a BSA Space in Boston opening June 17th 2015. The purpose of the proxy series of installations is to experiment with with the workflow of an entire project, from conception to construction.  Though these projects operate at smaller dimensional, programmatic and financial scales, they are always addressing larger issues of design practice by crafting resonance between procedural and material effects.

Proxy No. 15 is a lightweight, translucent suspension structure built from recyclable polypropylene and nylon. The installation is derived from the architectonic language, assembly process, manufacturing techniques, and material effects of Proxy No. 10, an installation created for the American Institute of Architects National Emerging Practitioners Exhibition in 2012. No. 10 was designed as an interior pavilion at the AIA Headquarters in Washington, DC using a series of custom-coded digital modeling algorithms to rationalize, structure, and generate all the parts required to build the pavilion in a single day. No. 15was designed by reprogramming those algorithms, inverting many of the original pavilions characteristics; whereas No. 10 is oriented vertically, configured through two minimal surfaces, operating in compression, resting on the floor and rising to a height of 7 feet; No. 15 is a synclining symmetrical landscape, oriented horizontally, operating in tension, and suspended twelve feet above the floor.

 

Read More

Landformation Catalogue Exhibition Opens at Harvard University

The Landformation  Catalogue  Exhibition  held at Harvard University Graduate School of Design from  March 27th - May 16th examines the generative methodologies of landform manipulation, revealing correlations between the histories, morphologies, assemblies, materials, and affordances of landscape practice. It analyzes the resulting spatial artifacts of humanity’s larger Earth transformation project.

The exhibition was supported by the generosity of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design (GSD), GSD Lectures and Exhibitions, and the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Read More

"Excerpts from the Proxy Series" | Exhibited @ RISD Art Museum

“Excerpts from the Proxy Series” -  Models from Proxies No. 08 + No. 10  will be on display as part of the Rhode Island School of Design Faculty Biennale held at the RISD Museum Chase Center from February 19th through March 22nd, 2015. 

Proxies complete systems of inquiry and production with strategically reduced complexity which correlate to more extensive systems of uncertainty. More than just a substitute, proxies transmit the agency, qualities, and considerations of that which they represent. At times the conditions within which we find ourselves working are often truncated, constraining our ability to operate within in typical modes or scale of practice. Proxies offer a methodology for accepting these constraints as a way of expanding design inquiry while remaining grounding in fundamental design problems.  The Proxy Series began in 2007 as an on-going set of research-based projects focused on the exploration of emerging technologies and how they are reshaping design theory, process, and production. Each project investigates a discrete set of issues spanning all three of these categories. While each is aligned to address a specific design problem, the imposition of extra-disciplinary constraints allows us to, pursue production techniques, use materials, employee software, or work with others, outside our particular disciplines. As such proxies offer an alternative formulation of how we research design problems in architecture, landscape architecture, and industrial design.

Read More

Transformations Exhibition opens at the Sackler Museum

The Transformations Studio introduces basic architectural concepts and techniques used to address issues of form, function, ornament, and material. The course provides instruction in project analysis, visualization, communication, and fabrication, using both physical and digital modeling. Students proceed through a series of progressively complex investigations of transformational processes, contexts, programs, and material assemblages. As an introduction to architectural design, the course explores comprehensive and foundational design principles, skill sets + critical thinking with making.

Transformations, an exhibition of student work from the undergraduate architecture studio is open May 5-7,2014 at the Sackler Museum on the campus of Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Studio Instructor: Zaneta Hong

Teaching Assistants: Fred Thwainy + Phoebe White

Undergraduate Students: Kathleen Hanley, Angie Jo, 

Matthew Ricotta, Linda Song, James Thurm,

Liesl Ulrich-Verderber, John Wang, Sherrie Wang, Gianina Yumul

Harvard University, Sackler Museum

Read More

Manufactured Assemblages opens @ Harvard GSD

Manufactured Assemblages, an exhibition of student work from the undergraduate architecture workshop opens on February 03, 2013 at Gund Hall on the campus of Harvard University.

The January Arts Intensive explored material assemblages through an investigation of manufactured artifacts. The course introduced 12 undergraduate students to the design processes that incorporated experimentation, thinking through making, and iterative methodologies. Students exercised their minds and hands with an intensive series of material investigations producing a variety of formal and spatial artifacts. Students were challenged to explore different media and operations utilized in architectural design, visual communication, and material fabrication. Over the course of the intensive, the students’ abilities to create, construct and communicate provided a pathway to establishing their own distinct design process.

 

Manufactured Assemblages Exhibition

Workshop Instructor: Zaneta Hong

Students: Wahaj Chaudhry, Sophia Chesrow, Amy Jiang, Avery Leonard, Henry Li,Katharina Lierhaus, Emily Lowe, Valentina Lyau, Noel Painter, Hoo In Song, Humbi Song,Nandhini Sundaresan, Stella Tu

Course: January Arts Intensive Workshop

Harvard University, Graduate School of Design

Read More

Proxy No. 10 opens @ AIA Headquarters, Washington DC

Proxy No. 10 is a pavilion situated in the lobby of the American Institute of Architects Headquarters Building in Washington DC. The building was designed by The Architects Collaborative in 1973. As with the TAC’s design approach which is based on multiple voices incorporated into a single design, Proxy No. 10 derives its form and program in collaboration with the building’s lobby configuration and spatial orientations.  The pavilion’s  bounds are created by aligning two ellipsoids relative to each adjacent lobby wall. The spatial configuration is generated as a resultant minimal surface extrapolated between the two ellipsoids, which are in turn organized into two unit topologies. The pavilion utilizes 44 motion sensors lights that track movement inside the pavilion which is then indexed on its public surface through 376 LEDs.

On display here is a portion of the pavilion (approx. 12%) constructed from 564 polypropylene sheets assembled using nylon rivets into 94 units. The installation which is part of the 2012 AIA Emerging Professional / Grassroots Exhibition is the 10th iteration of the proxy series - on-going research into computational models for design and manufacturing.  The Proxy Series began in 2007 as a framework for conducting design research. Proxies are constructions that examine the nature of generic architectural problems within programming, processes, procedures, manufacturing and assembly.

Read More