Kisumu Housing Studio Syllabus

 

Kisumu Housing Project

 

Overview

Rhode Island School of Design

Department of Interior Architecture & Adaptive Reuse

INTAR: 23ST-02

CIT 3rd floor studios

Tues & Thur 9:30am - 5:30pm

 

Critic: Michael Leighton Beaman

The discourse surrounding social responsibility, has shifted from one of participation, marked by state-sponsored projects, such as the Marshall Plan; to one of Initiation, as is evident with the proliferation of NGOs, which currently represent the world's 8th largest economy. Social responsibility for spatial designers is already folded into the definition of our collective built environment.  It is not an aspect or quality that requires import, only recognition and engagement.

What has marked this shift in both thinking and doing is not a new set of abilities or new forms of agency, rather it is a change in positioning (how do we begin, foster, and realize socially responsible projects) and approach (what is our place in this realization process, and how do we move beyond passive engagement to active creation)? Though new mechanisms have developed, new systems have emerged, and novel precedence have been set (all of which have expanded the way designers are able to address social concerns), social responsibility is first and foremost a matter of practice. For a set of disciplines guided by the mission to effect change in the built environment, social responsibility is one of many frameworks through which spatial design practices intervene in the world. And, it is within the world,  within its material, political, and technological composition, that designers must find means for adaptation and response.

This studio continues a series of academic design investigations that the focus on innovations in sustainable building practices and socially responsible design interventions. This current iteration will focus on reuse (materials, techniques, performances, and forms) and communication (universal, accessible, procedural, and affected) as two modes of  production that expand spatial design beyond the its immediate and specific goals of shelter and place, and into the broader project of our built environment. 

This semester we will be working with two non-profit organizations: Seeds of Life, a micro-finance and community outreach organization working in Kenya and headquartered in London; and GA Collaborative, a design and education organization working in Africa and North America, headquartered in New York. The Kisumu Housing Project is a collaborative effort to bring low-impact building technologies and construction methods to bear on flexible low-cost single family housing in Kisumu, Kenya.

Our studio will be working with both non-profits throughout the semester to research and design housing prototypes which can be built by communities with little or no construction experience. To facilitate that central goal, we will be designing and publishing a building design manual, a graphic guide for construction methods and techniques. This will require us to research and design diagrams, drawings, and images that are clear, concise, and illustrative. Most importantly, the publication will be tasked with communicating performances and practices across languages.

We will also be working with the RISD Writing Center to develop strategies for conveying information graphically, across languages and cultures, to expand the impact of our studio work specifically and design in general. 

This studio is structured around the following phases:

PHASE 01

  • A | Researching sustainable low-impact building technologies which require little to no construction skills and knowledge to build;
  • B | Designing flexible housing prototypes which use techniques discovered and/or created in part A;  

PHASE 02

  • C | Researching and/or creating graphic descriptions of materials, details, assemblies, and performances for building construction techniques from part A as they relate to configurations from part B;
  • D | Creating a “guide” which clearly and succinctly applies the research and design work from part C in a printed (and possibly on-line) publication.
 

Grading

All work and participation is graded using a points systems. Points are determined using three criteria, and distributed by the stated percentages and/or points. Points translate to grades from A - D in  +/- increments.

GRADE DISTRIBUTION: 
This studio is divided into two phases; 1) housing research and design and 2) housing design manual. Grade distribution for this module is as follows:

PHASE 01 | Housing Resarch & Design (50%)

  • A | 25 pts._ Material & Assembly Research
  • B | 20 pts._ Prototype Design

PHASE 02 | Housing Guide (50%)

  • C | 25 pts._ Graphic Illustrations & Research
  • D | 30 pts._ Final Publication

 

GRADING CRITERIA:
Grading will be determined by how well each student performs in the following areas: 

Understanding + Application
The understanding of the course/studio project at hand, combined with an appropriate process of inquiry & development of a consistent and rigorous analysis/design process with clearly articulated ideas.

Craft + Execution
The ability to accurately and precisely craft a digital and physical response to the analysis/design assignment.  This includes the ability to clearly and concisely communicate ideas, and produce well-formed digital and physical: models, diagrams, drawings, and images the project.

Effort+ Participation
The ability to engage in the assignment with fellow students and your instructor & the ability to receive criticism and incorporate this into your project’s development. Your ability to work in groups, meet deadlines, and contribute to studio culture.

 

GRADING DEFINITIONS:

A | Excellent:  90 - 100 points  
Project / Course Work surpasses expectations in terms of inventiveness, appropriateness, verbal and visual presentation, conceptual rigor, craft, and personal development. Student pursues concepts and techniques above and beyond what is discussed in class. Project is complete on all levels.
    
B | Good: 80 - 90 points
Project / Course Work is thorough, well researched, diligently pursued, and successfully completed.  Student pursues ideas and suggestions presented in class and puts in effort to resolve required projects. Project is complete on all levels and demonstrates potential for excellence.
    
C | Acceptable: 70 - 80 points
Project / Course Work meets the minimum requirements. Suggestions made in class are not pursued with dedication or rigor. Project is incomplete in one or more areas.
    
D | Poor: 60 - 70 points
Project / Course Work is incomplete. Basic skills, technological competence, verbal clarity, and/or logic of presentation are not level-appropriate. Student does not demonstrate the required design skill and knowledge base. Work is incomplete.

 

Research + Publication 

Our design work will revolve around finding reciprocity between design research and design communication ( in the form of a publication).  See schedule for weekly focus.   

RESEARCH
This studio will begin by focusing on materials and construction techniques research. This will become the basis of each student's housing program development and formal design strategies. Assignments will focus on exploring each of the aspects below. 

Materials & Construction Techniques Research*

  • Materials
  • Program
  • Assembly
  • Form + Organization
  • Performance
  • Accessibility
  • Systems

 

PUBLICATION
The studio publication will require us to generate graphic standards, layouts and narratives that are "accessible" and as much as possible "universal". This will require work in groups on organized and consistent production, and documentation. To achieve these goals groups will be assigned the following areas of research, design and production: 

Guides, Instructions & Graphics Research*

  • Graphic Language
  • Narative
  • Organization
  • Context
  • Citations
  • Logistics
 

Schedule

The course schedule reflects the provisional allocation of time for each area of inquiry and production. The duration and deliverable in each area will evolve (with your input) throughout the semester.  

* schedule & assignments subject to change through out the semester

SCHEDULE
The studio publication will require us to generate graphic standards, layouts and narratives that are "accessible" and as much as

Assignment + Publication Schedule*

Phase 01 | Housing Prototypes: Research & Design

Week 01 | Sept. 08 

Research: Construction Techniques + Building Materials Research

Week 02 | Sept. 13 + 15 

Research: Construction Techniques + Building Materials Research

Research: Cultural History & Living Patterns & Built Environment

Communication: Assembly & Construction Techniques Descriptions

Week 03 | Sept. 20 + 22  

Research: Material, Forms & Performances

Research: Cultural History & Living Patterns & Built Environment

Communication One Day in Kisumu

Boston Field Trip or Writing Center Charette

Week 04 | Sept. 27 + 29 

Research: Material, Forms & Performances

Communication: Assembly & Construction Techniques Descriptions

Week 05 | Oct. 04 + 06

Design: Program & Performance + Organization & Form

Design: Prototype Configurations

Review 01

Week 06 | Oct. 11 + 13

Design: Organization & Form

Design: Prototype Configurations

Review 02

Week 07 | Oct. 18 + 20

Design: Prototype Configurations

Communication: Presentation & Documentation

Int|Ar Charette

Week 08 | Oct. 25 + 27

Communication: Presentation & Documentation

Boston Field Trip or Writing Center Charette

 

Phase 02 | Housing Guide: Research & Design

Week 09 | Nov. 01 + 03

Research: Manuals & Illustrations + Precedence & Examples 

Writing: Guide - Goals & Processes

Writing: Guide - Table of Contents

Week 10 | Nov. 08 + 10

Research: Graphic Language + Layouts + Printing + Documentation + Text

Writing: Assembly & Construction Techniques Descriptions

Review 03

Week 11 | Nov. 15 + 17

Design: Graphic Language + Layouts + Printing + Documentation + Text

Design: Diagrams + Technical Drawings

Writing: Performance Descriptions

Week 12 | Nov. 22 + 24

Thanksgiving Break

Week 13 | Nov. 29 + Dec. 01

Design: Final Illustrations & Citations

Writing: Introduction + Documentation

Review 04

Week 14 | Dec. 06 + 08

Design: Final Layouts & Text

 

Finals | Reviews, Presentations, & Submissions

Week 15 | TBA 

Final Review

Publication Submission

 

Policies 

The following adhere to the Rhode Island School of Design polices and may impact your grade. Please read carefully.

PARTICIPATION
Students are required to participate in all class activities. Participation includes completing assignments and group presentations, contributing to class discussions, and presenting work. Each student is expected to come to class prepared with questions and comments about assigned reading(s), and completed assignments.  


LATE/TARDY
Students who are 15 minutes late to class will be marked late. 3 late days = 1 unexcused absence. 4 unexcused absences will result in a lowering of one letter grade, and an additional letter grade for each unexcused absence thereafter. Regardless of tardy of absence, students are responsible to complete all assignments on time, unless alternative arrangements have been made with the instructor.


ACADEMIC HONESTY:
RISD is committed to the principles of intellectual honesty and integrity. Members of the RISD community are expected to maintain complete honesty in all academic work, presenting only that which is their own work in tests and assignments. 


STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES:
Any student who feels s/he may require accommodation based on the impact of a disability should contact the instructor privately at the beginning of the semester to discuss specific needs. Please contact the Office of Student Development and Counseling Services directly to coordinate reasonable accommodations.

 

DIGITAL SUBMISSION:
Students are required to submit documentation of their work to both the instructor and RISD. Late submissions will be graded accordingly. Incomplete and/or failing grades will be given to any student who fails to submit both sets of work documentation.

Instructor
Documentation of all assignments and final project must be submitted to the instructor via Google Drive folder (link will be provided). This submission must include the following:

 1. Packaged InDesign file + PDF of final project board
 2. Photos of your final construction
 3. All files and requirements from previous assignments 

File naming convention:  Beaman_A01_Diagram

RISD
Documentation of your final project is required via RISD server submission using RISD documentation standards found here.


Resources

Bellow are resources we will use this semester.  These will be added to throughout the semester.

STUDIO FILES & STORAGE

Studio Google Drive

Studio Pinterest Page

Neufert's Architect's Data

Rhino Script: Axon

 

 

References

Additional text which expand on the concepts covered in this course, and/or provide historical contexts and references for assignments, presentations, and seminars. 

ONLINE:

RISD Writing Center Handouts

ADAAccesibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities 2010

ADA: Standards for Accessible Design.

International Building Codes

World Resources Institute

Prefab Latrine Toilets for Kenya

 

TEXT:

Neufert, Ernst &  Peter Neufert, Johannes Kister. Neufert's Architects' Data. Berlin: John Wiley & Sons,  2012

Dreyfuss, Henry. The Measure of Man, Ergonomics in Design, New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1966. (excerpts)

Panero, Julius &  Martin ZelnikHuman Dimension & Interior Space: A Source Book of Design Reference Standards. Watson-Guptill; Revised ed. 1979

Hunter, Kaki & Donald KiffmeyerEarthbag Building: The Tools, Tricks and Techniques. New Society Publishers, 2004.

Crimmel, Sukita Reay. Earthen Floors: A Modern Approach to an Ancient Practice. New Society Publishers,  2014.

Rael, Ronald. Earth Architecture. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2010.

Ciancio, Daniela & Christopher Beckett ed. Rammed Earth Construction: Cutting-Edge Research on Traditional and Modern Rammed Earth. CRC Press, 2015

Ford, Edward R. The Architectural Detail. New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2010.

Ching, Francis D. K. Building Codes Illustrated: A Guide to Understanding the 2015 International Building Code, 5th Edition. New York: Wiley 2016.  (earlier editions are acceptable)

Ching, Francis D. K. Building Construction Illustrated, 5th Edition. New York: Wiley 2014 (earlier editions are acceptable)

Allen, Edward & Joseph Iano. Fundamentals of Building Construction: Materials and Methods, 6th Edition. New York: Wiley, 2013. (earlier editions are acceptable)

Allen, Edward & Joseph Iano. The Architect's Studio Companion: Rules of Thumb for Preliminary Design, 5th Edition. New York: Wiley, 2011. (earlier editions are acceptable)

di Mari, Anthony and Nora Yoo. Operative Design: A Catalog of Spatial Verbs. Amsterdam: BIS Publishers, 2012.

Lewis, Karen. Graphic Design for Architects, A Manual for Visual Communication. New York & London: Routledge, 2015.

Addis, Bill. 3000 Years of Design Engineering and Construction. London & New York: Phaidon Press Limited, 2007.

Tufte, Edward R. Envisioning Information. Cheshire: Graphics Press LLC, 1990.

Bell, Victoria Ballard & Patrick Rand. Materials for Design. New York: Princeton Architectural Press. 2006.

Bell, Victoria Ballard & Patrick Rand. Materials for Design 2. New York: Princeton Architectural Press. 2014.

Sandaker, Bjorn N., Arne P. Eggen, & Mark R. Cruvellier. The Structural Basis of Architecture, 2nd ed. London & New York: Routledge, 2011

 

Project Site

We will be working in a rural region just outside of Kisumu, Kenya. Because we are developing strategies and practices associated with the development of housing prototypes we will be designing for multiple"sites".

 

Project Standards

Our studio will be creating a publication that communicates our research and design work. To make our work consistently legible and formatted to fit into our studio publication we will develop graphic standards for various types of graphic displays of information, diagrams, drawings, and other images.

Graphics Standards | Line Drawings

PLANS / SECTIONS / ELEVATIONS

  • Cut Line:
    • 2.0pt,
    • Registration Black
  • Outline:
    • 1.5pt
    • Registration Black
  • Elevation:
    • 0.75pt
    • Registration Black
  • Pattern/Hatch:
    • 0.25pt
    • Gray: 75%
  • Above:
    • 0.5pt
    • Dash (2pt / 1pt)
    • Gray 50%
  • Hidden:
    • 0.5pt
    • Dash (1pt / 1pt)
    • Gray 50%
  • Door Swings / Below:
    • 0.25pt
    • Dash (1pt / 1pt)
    • Gray 25%
  • Elevation + Plan Shadows:
    • Fill: Registration 10%
  • People:
    • Fill: Registration 25%

 

AXONOMETRIC & ISOMETRIC

  • Outline:
    • 1.75pt
    • Registration Black
  • Elevation:
    • 0.75pt
    • Registration Black
  • Pattern/Hatch:
    • 0.25pt
    • Gray: 75%
  • Above:
    • 0.5pt
    • Dash (2pt / 1pt)
    • Gray 50%
  • Hidden:
    • 0.5pt
    • Dash (1pt / 1pt)
    • Gray 50%

 

ANNOTATION

  • Leaders + Arrows:
    • 0.25pt
    • Gray 50%
    • text: 6pt
  • Dimensions:
    • 0.25pt
    • Gray 25%
    • text: 6pt
  • Grids:
    • 0.25pt
    • Dash (3pt / 1pt)
    • Gray: 25%
 

Graphics Standards | Data Graphics

MAPS:

  • Outline:
    • 2.0pt,
    • Registration Black
  • Interior Divisions
    • 2.0pt,
    • Registration Black

 

GRAPHS:

  • Outline:
    • 2.0pt,
    • Registration Black
  • Interior Divisions
    • 2.0pt,
    • Registration Black

 

DIAGRAMS:

  • Outline:
    • 2.0pt,
    • Registration Black
  • Interior Divisions
    • 2.0pt,
    • Registration Black
 

Graphics Teams | Templates & Editing

LAYOUTS:

  1. Minhee
  2. YJ
  3. Yi

ICONS:

  1. Shanaiya
  2.  Udeeta

GRAPHS: 

  1. Claudia
  2. Julie

MAPS:

  1. Hannah
  2. Shuang

MATERIALS & ASSEMBLIES: ( Building Construction Drawings)

  1. Di
  2. Yi

TECHNICAL DRAWINGS: (Plans, Sections & Axons)

  1. Eshank
  2. Elizabeth

DIAGRAMS: (Building Performance, Organization & Forms)

  1. Khisha
  2. Anya

Publication

Though we are working on a semester long project divided into two major parts, smaller assignments will be issued throughout the semester to address specific needs and to keep the studio focused on our projected deliverables. These assignments will be added here.

* schedule & assignments subject to change through out the semester

Ch. 00 | Front Matter

  • Copyright
  • Publisher
  • Editor
  • Graphics info
  • Partners
 

Ch. 01 | Introduction

INTRO:

  • About | Michael
  • Partnerships | Michael

DATA:

  • Project Phases | Michael
  • Prototypes | Michael
  • Global North & South (map) | Eshank
  • Participants & Organizations (Map) | Eshank
  • Time Table | Michael
 

Ch. 02 | Guide

COLORS:

 

ICONS : (Udeeta & Shanaiya)

  1. Materials
    1. Manufactured
    2. Raw
  2. Tools
  3. Operations
    1. Movements
    2. Skill
    3. Time

MAPS: (Shuang & Hannah)

  1. Regions
  2. Outlines
  3. Points
  4. Circles

GRAPHS: (Julie & Claudia)

  1. Scale 1 | small
  2. Scale 2 | large
 

Ch. 03 | Context

MAPS: 

  1. Income / Poverty (Shuang & Hannah)
  2. Climate Risks (Shuang & Hannah)
  3. Water Bodies (Shuang & Hannah)
  4. Transportation (Shuang & Hannah)
  5. Population Density (Shuang & Hannah)
  6. Topography (Shuang & Hannah)
  7. Vegetation (Shuang & Hannah)

 

GRAPHS: 

  1. Rainfall (Minhee & Claudia)
  2. Solar Orientation (Anya & 
  3. Diurnal Temperature Fluctuation (Di & YJ)
  4. Seasonal Temperature Fluctuation (Di & YJ)
  5. Wind Orientation
  6. Humidity
  7. Housing | Program & Materials (Krishna & Claudia)
 

Ch. 04 | Assemblies

  1. Earth Bags  (Anya)
  2. Woven Walls (Elizabeth)
  3. Bamboo Framing (Hannah)
  4. Steel Framing (Yi)?
  5. Corrugated Steel Roof (Julie)
  6. Compressed Earth Block (Udeeta)
  7. Brick (Shanaiya)
  8. Ferrocement (Eshank)
  9. Thatch Roofing (Shuang)
  10. Concrete Ring Beam (YJ)
  11. Concrete & Stone Foundation (Minhee)
  12. Bini Shell (Di)
  13. Rammed Earth (Elizabeth)
  14. ? (Krishna)
 

Ch. 05  | Prototypes

  1. Modular House  /  Msimu Nyumba (Yi)
  2. Thatch Tent House / Lamba Hema Nyumba  (Shuang)
  3. Landscape House /  Mazingira Nyumba  (Minhee)
  4. Split House / Mgawanyiko Nyumba  (Krishna)
  5. Folding House / Kukunja Nyumba (Elizabeth)
  6. Leaf House / Jani Nyumba (Hannah)
  7. Shell House / Ganda Nyumba (Di)
  8. Wall House / Ukuta Nyumba (Claudia)
  9. Ribbon House / Nyumba Utepe (YJ)
  10. Vault House / Kuba Nyumba (Eshank)
  11. Butterfly House / Mrengo Wa Nyumba (Shanaiya)
  12. Finger House / Nyumba Kidole (Udeeta)
  13. Wind House / Nyumba Upepo ( Julie)
  14. Mass House /  Wingi Nyumba (Anya)
 

Ch. 06  | Implementation

  1. Phases
  2. Future Prototypes
  3. Time Table Graph
 

Ch. 00 | Credits & Acknowledgements

  1. RISD
  2. GA Collaborative
  3. Seeds of Life
  4. Students & Faculty
 

Assignments

Though we are working on a semester long project divided into two major parts, smaller assignments will be issued throughout the semester to address specific needs and to keep the studio focused on our projected deliverables. These assignments will be added here.

* schedule & assignments subject to change through out the semester

A01 | Collecting Precedence:

(individual & group work)  | Due: 09.13.16

STEPS:

  1. Create a studio pinterest account.
  2. Select / Elect an account manager.
  3. Create the following boards:
    • Building Materials
    • Building Techniques
    • Building Performances
    • Reused / Recycled Building Materials & Techniques
    • Kenyan Architecture
    • Graphic Language
    • Manuals, Booklets, Pamplets, Posters
    • Graphic Layouts
    • "How to" Graphics
    • Icons
  4. Populate Boards: minimum 3 pins per student, per board.
 

A02 | Building Techniques

(individual work) | Due: 09.13.16

- Document & Cite where you get all information - 

STEPS:

  1. Research the following Construction Techniques  
    • Tectonics:
      • Wood Assemblies (post & beam, with a building skin)
      • Woven & Rattan Constructions
      • Steel Assemblies (post & beam, with a building skin)
      • Concrete Frame (post & beam, with an infill)
      • Bamboo Frame
    • Stereotomics / Monolithics
      • Rammed Earth
      • Earth Bags / Sand Bags
      • Compressed Earth Block
      • CMU
      • Brick
    • Composites
      • Wattle & Daub
      • Straw-Clay (Leichtlehm) / Hempcrete 
      • Monocot Systems (Moladi for example)
  2. Answer the following Questions about each technique (these can be answered with drawings, text, images, diagrams, etc):
    • What is the structural logic of each?
    • What is the assembly logic of each?
    • How are each produced? -  (what resources & industries are involved)
    • What skill level required to utilize this technique? - ( we will develop a comparative scale)
    • How do they perform?
    • What is their lifespan?
    • What is their embedded energy? - (how much energy does it require to produce buildings from these techniques)
 

A03 | Visual Communications 01 part A

(individual & group work)  | Due: 09.15.16

- Document & Cite where you get all information - 

STEPS:

  1. Using the research you conducted in assignment 02 (& 01) sketch out a set of diagrams/drawings that communicate the following:
    • Structural Logic (one diagram)
    • Assembly Logic (one diagram or set of diagrams)
  2. Share these with a partner; discuss, and critique. Using pinned images as precedents, review how you both would convert these sketches into vector-based graphics. 
  3.  Swap sketches with your partner.
  4. Using AutoCAD, Rhino, or any other Vector-based graphics software create a minimal version of your partner's diagrams 1 & 2
  5. Import these into illustrator and define:
    • Line weight
    • Line color
    • Line type
    • Infills / shading
    • Illustrative instructions (arrows, dots, dashed lines, etc.)
    • Do not use any colors other than black or grays.
    • Diagrams must be on a white back ground.  
 

A04 | Bodies & Equipment

(individual & group work)  | Due: 09.15.16

Our goal is to design spaces that are multi-functional and efficient. To do this we need to know the size and shape of both the bodies and equipment that will inhabit these spaces. We will begin by building an entourage of humans and non-humans to work from. These should be vector line drawings. 

STEPS:

Bodies (10 drawings)

  1. Find or create poly-line drawings (silhouettes) for the following body positions.
  2. Each position should be shown in plan, front elevation and side elevation. (these can be done separately). Make sure the drawings are clean and properly joined. Test each by exporting them to illustrator and filling them. 
  3. Each position should be created for an adult and child (vary ages and sexes).
  4. Save all the drawings together as both dwg and illustrator files. Then create a single file with all the drawing included.
  5. Upload the combined file to our studio google drive folder.
    • Standing 
    • Sitting 
    • Working (at a counter, table, or freely)
    • Sleeping 
    • Walking (or some other action)
  6. Print @ 1:20 scale on 11" X 17" paper

 

Equipment (8 drawings)

  1. Find or create poly-line drawings for the following body positions.
  2. Each position should be shown in plan, front elevation and side elevation. (these can be done separately). Make sure the drawings are clean and properly joined. Test each by exporting them to illustrator and filling them. 
  3. Save all the drawings together as both dwg and illustrator files. Then create a single file with all the drawing included.
  4. Upload the combined file to our studio google drive folder.
    • Bed
    • Table
    • Chair
    • Toilet
    • Sink 
    • Basin (large sink or floor trough for washing)
    • Shower
    • Shelving
  5. Print @ 1:20 scale on 11" X 17" paper

 

Scenarios (7 drawings - work in groups of 2)

  1. Combine figures drawings from "bodies" and "equipment" into mini-programmed spaces, or program scenarios. Think of the activities that are taking place in each situation, how the body moves through the space and its range of motion. This will help you determine the space needed for each scenario.
  2. Each scenario should be shown in plan, front elevation and side elevation.
  3. Use line types, and layers to separate information.  This will be helpful in generating diagrams later. 
  4. Include the following information along with the drawings of bodies and equipment:
    • Boundary of Activity - on a separate layer. Beyond just the size of bodies and equipment what are the dimensions of this activity? This should be drawn using typical dimension notation. Use metric measurements.
    • Shape of Activity - on a separate layer. Beyond just the shape and size of bodies and equipment what are the shapes of this activity? Think about the bodies range of motion. This drawing should show the shape of movements using dotted lines.
    • Intensity of Activity - on a separate layer. This set of lines should show where a person spends the most time and energy within this scenario. This drawing should be depicted as a topography, overlapping movements or silhouettes, or some other illustrative form. Collaborate with your partner on how this should be shown.
  5. Save all the drawings together as both dwg and illustrator files. Then create a single file with all the drawings included.
  6. Upload the combined file to our studio google drive folder.
  7. Print @ 1:20 scale on 11" X 17" paper
 

A05 | Environmental Conditions

( group work)  | Due: 09.20.16

- Document & Cite where you get all information - 

STEPS:

  1. Create a diagram for the following sets of climatological information (one topic per group):
    1. Rainfall through out the year
    2. Solar orientation - 1 year - (Plan and Section)
    3. Diurnal temperature fluctuation
    4. Seasonal temperature fluctuation
    5. Wind orientation / Wind Rose (includes wind direction, intensity, speed, throughout the year)
    6. Seasonal humidity fluctuations
    7. Extreme Weather potentials (seismic activity, flooding, heavy rainfall, drought)
  2. Each diagram should be to scale and vector-based.
  3. Save as an illustrator file and print on 11" x 17" paper.
 

A06 | Visual Communications 01 part B

(individual & group work)  | Due: 09.20.16

- Document & Cite where you get all information - 

STEPS:

  1. Using the diagrams you completed in A03, and as a class, determine a relative scale, scope, and directives (arrows, icons, etc) for each diagram. Redraw,or adapt your current diagrams so that all 14 building technologies are comparable graphically. 
    • Structural Logic (one diagram)
    • Assembly Logic (one diagram or set of diagrams)
  2. Devise a scale for determining the skill level needed to build using each techniques.  This can be numerical, a graphic. an icon, or some other mode of representing information through a continuous range. 
  3. Devise a scale for representing the amount of operational & embodied energy in each material assembly. This should be based on the same area or volume of construction (1m x 1m for example). And, it should be based on the same metric and methodology of energy calculation. 
  4. Add the information for skill level and embedded energy to your redrawn diagrams from Step .1. 
 

A07 | Mapping Kenya

( group work)  | Due: 09.27.16

- Document & Cite where you get all information - 

 

STEPS:

  1. Create a .dwg base map using Kenya's state boundaries
  2. Review the GIS files in our studio google drive > GIS data
  3. One map will be used for the entire studio. As a group produce a single "clean" file. Complete the following:
    • Remove all extraneous lines, text, blocks, and layers.
    • Convert splines and curves into polyline
    • Join all un-joined lines and polylines
    • Explode or release blocks
    • Flatten
    • Remove all duplicate objects
    • Purge all unused objects, blocks, and layers. 
    • Save as .dwg
  4. Research the following area:
    1. Demographics
    2. Political entities
    3. Political boundaries
    4. Imports
    5. Exports
    6. Climate (diurnal, seasonal, & annual)
    7. Transportation
    8. Energy
    9. Land-forms
    10. Vegetation
    11. Protected areas
    12. Colonization History
 

A08 | Program Scenarios

(individual work) | Due: 09.27.16

- Document & Cite where you get all information - 

Building off your initial activity diagrams from A04, combined with the class' graphic standards for activity diagramming, create 2 activity diagrams that involve at least one person and one piece of equipment. One diagram should show one domestic activity you yourself have experience with: eating, sleeping, studying, etc. The second diagram should depict and a domestic activity that takes place in Kisumu, Kenya, or Sub Saharan Africa. You do not have to have had direct experience with this activity. Be sure to document where you have found information on this activity. 

STEPS:

  1. Research activities that are either unique or common to Kisumu, Kenya, or Sub Saharan Africa.  For example: cleaning and preparing fish for market from near by Lake Victoria, or hand washing clothes.
  2. Document where you have found this information.  It can be from the web, put also from interviews from those with direct experience, text from authors that describe these activities, existing diagrams or drawings, videos, films, audio recordings, etc. 
  3. Examine if these activity require additional or modified equipment from what has already been drawn. 
  4. Create a diagram using our activities graphic standards.  These should be drawn to scale in AutoCAD or Rhino and transferred to illustrator. 
  5. Using the first diagram as a guide draw one domestic activity you have direct experience of.  Play close attention to what you take for granted within the overall explanation or mapping of the activity. 
  6. Create a diagram using our activities graphic standards.  These should be drawn to scale in AutoCAD or Rhino and transferred to illustrator. 
 

A09 | Building Design - Part A

(individual) | Due: 10.06.16

Design Considerations:

  • People
    • Single Family: 4 min - 6 max
    • Double Family: 4 min - 8 max
    • Multiple Adults: 3 min - 5 max
  • Activities
    • Food Prep (storage, washing, cooking)
    • Dining
    • Leisure
    • Sleeping
    • Working
    • Bathing
    • Toilet (separate building)
  • Functions
    • Natural Ventilation
    • Natural Lighting - Indirect
    • Shading - Direct 
    • Water Collection
    • Water Storage
    • Water Resistance
    • Seismic Resistance

 

Design Presentations

  • 3d Model / Physical Model (should include)
    • building structure 
    • construction materials
    • water collection and storage
  • Drawings
    • Floor Plan
    • Roof Plan
    • Longitudinal Section
    • Cross Sections
  • Diagrams
    • Material and Construction Strategy
    • Natural Systems Strategy (water, lighting , ventalation)
    • Building Organization
    • Activity/Space Planning ( Includes equipment, furniture, landscape and architectural elements)
 

A10 | Visual Communications 02 : Graphics Templates

(individual) | Due: 10.11.16

Each Graphic Standards Group should have completed a preliminary graphics template for your drawings type. ( See "Standards" above for teams) 

Each template should specify the following:

  • size
  • line types
  • line weights
  • line colors and/or transparencies
  • figures as outlines or fills
  • fills types (colors or hatches)
  • colors
  • hatch patterns
  • fonts
  • font sizes
  • font spacing
  • font colors & transparencies
  • illustrator art-board dimensions
  • illustrator guide lines
  • illustrator layer types. These should include (if applicable):
    • Titles
    • Text
    • Icons
    • Outlines
    • Backgrounds
    • Elevation lines
    • Background lines
    • Shaded areas
  • illustrator color mode (RGB or CMYK)
 

A11 | Wall/Roof Form Model

(individual) | 9 Due: 10.11.16 | +3 due 10.18.16

Materials: Foam-core + Card-stock

Scale:  1:100

Using Foam-core for load barring walls and Card-stock for roof surfaces create 9 building configurations (combinations of walls and roofs)

  1. Do not cut windows or doors in the foam-core sheets, instead think of the foam-core as being the portion of a wall that receives and distributes loads from a roof. Windows and doors can be thought of an missing sections of the wall.  For those making curvalinear walls, foam-core can be cut (in plan ) and laminated to create a curving wall.  
  2. Roofs should be thought of as a single surface, a folder surface, or multiple discontinuous surfaces.  For complex surface shapes you will need to model these in Rhino, unroll them (so they are flat surfaces),  print the outlines or edges of the surface on card stock, cut, then folded, or rolled back into a 3D shape. 
  3. Play close attention to where the roof surface and walls meet. Only these two elements should be used. Once glued together these two elements should be self supporting. 
  4. Wall configurations and roof configurations can repeat, but no two combinations should repeat. 

These models should be built at 1:100 scale.

 

A12 | Building Design - Part B

(individual) | 1 Due: 10.13.16

Size: 4, 11" x 17" sheets min.  

Scale: 1:50 or 1:100 (talk to Julie and Eshank)

Design Presentations

  • Axonometric Drawings
    • building structure 
    • construction materials
    • water collection and storage
  • Drawings
    • Floor Plan
    • Roof Plan
    • Longitudinal Section
    • Cross Sections
  • Diagrams
    • Material and Construction Strategy
    • Natural Systems Strategy (water, lighting , ventalation)
    • Building Organization
    • Activity/Space Planning ( Includes equipment, furniture, landscape and architectural elements)
  • Model (from assignment 11)
 

A13 | Wall/Roof Assembly Model

(individual) | 1 Due: 10.18.16 | + 1 Due: 10.27.16

Materials: maximum 3 materials can be used

Scale: 1:25

Build a section of your wall that includes foundation and roof (see images below). 

  1. Play close attention to the scale of elements (blocks, steel, wood, etc.) and two the patterns of accumulations.
  2. Show how foundations connect to walls and walls to roof. 
  3. Do not simulate colors, but do simulate or communicate texture through notation.